Tag Archives: charitable estate planning

STRATEGIC PLAN FOR FUND DEVELOPMENT—PART ONE: From the Big Ideals to the Nitty-gritty Details

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Over the last two years, I’ve been asking organizational leaders privately and publically if they have a strategic plan specifically for the fund development aspect of their organization. At a recent conference, I put that question to over 700 fundraisers. Only three raised their hand. The lack of response to this very informal survey and my follow-up conversations seem to beg two questions: 1) Is a list of fundraising goals the same as a strategic plan for fund development and 2) what difference does it make? Continue reading

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THE FAMILY STORY: Recognizing Our Opportunities for Legacy Gifts

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For ages on end, people have derived their sense of place and purpose in the context of multi-generational family stories. Unfortunately and for various reasons, fewer and fewer have that experience today. In this blog I talk about my 12-year involvement in the gatherings of one exceptional family of donors and about one important lesson for planned giving executives.  Continue reading

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BEATING THE ODDS: Five Donor-Relations Strategies That Impact Bequest Fulfillments

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In the previous blog I explained why the fulfillment rate of donor bequests was either good news or bad news, depending primarily on whether or not organizational leaders truly believe they can have a positive influence on revocable commitments. I want to finish my thoughts about bequest retention with a few practical suggestions on how the best fund-development departments beat the odds and prove that the negative statistics do not apply to them. Continue reading

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NONPROFIT BATTING AVERAGE: Increasing Your Organization’s Bequest Retention Rate

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The results of a twenty-year survey among donors with charitable gift commitments in their estate plans revealed that the retention rate at the ten-year mark was about 55%. In other words, almost half the respondents reported that they no longer had a charitable gift in their estate plans. Somewhere in that ten-year period they had revoked the revocable bequest. That survey constitutes either bad news or good news, depending on whether your organization has a progressive or regressive perspective. The follow post explains how and why. Continue reading

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A GENERAL THEORY OF FUND-DEVELOPMENT: Five Decisions that Keep Your Organization on the Front Side of the Momentum Curve

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Over the last few years I’ve posted a lot of articles on various aspects of the fund-development process. Some articles zoom in on one specific aspect of donor relations while others are more big-picture applications. In this article, I want to distill out from the whole of our ongoing conversations five big ideas about fund-development, which in one way or another contribute to the single-most identifiable characteristic of highly successful institutions. Continue reading

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GREAT CONVERSATIONS: The Foundation of Great Donor Relationships

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In previous posts I’ve talked about the importance of regular and meaningful conversations with donors. All those thoughts are a result of the one sure thing I know—great donor conversations are the essential foundation of great donor relationships. Rarely does the latter occur without the former. It’s that simple. And so, if your goal is to have a long and successful career as a fundraiser, then the focus of your professional development should be to become an expert conversationalist. Continue reading

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THE SECOND QUESTION: Talking to Donors About Their Kids’ Inheritance

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The first question about how much parents will need for the rest of their lives is not that difficult. The second question about children’s inheritance is often more complex because it’s not just a matter of how much we can give, but how much we should give and when. Below are a few thoughts on what to say and what not to say in a planned giving conversation about transferring wealth to the next generation. Continue reading

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