Tag Archives: estate planning

TWO HURDLES: Overcoming Donors’ Greatest Anxieties with a Blended-gift Approach

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Before making any major or planned gift, donors have to answer key questions about inheritance strategy and their own financial sustainabilty. Concerns about leaving significant amounts of wealth to the next generation have always lurked in the back of donors’ minds. What we are seeing over the last few years is increasing donor anxiety over what they will need for the rest of their lives. Whether that is good news or bad news for planned giving has a lot to do with leadership philosophy and perspective. Continue reading

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BEATING THE ODDS: Five Donor-Relations Strategies That Impact Bequest Fulfillments

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In the previous blog I explained why the fulfillment rate of donor bequests was either good news or bad news, depending primarily on whether or not organizational leaders truly believe they can have a positive influence on revocable commitments. I want to finish my thoughts about bequest retention with a few practical suggestions on how the best fund-development departments beat the odds and prove that the negative statistics do not apply to them. Continue reading

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THE FUTURE OF NONPROFIT NAVIGATION: Missing Data That Leads to Bad Decisions

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As an instrument-rated pilot with hundreds of hours in the cockpit, I understand the importance of focusing on data on my dashboard, particularly in stormy weather or when the way ahead is uncertain. When an inexperienced pilot gets into trouble, it usually begins with a single wrong assumption based on incomplete or incorrect interpretation of the instrument data. That’s followed by a series of bad decisions, each compounding the problem. I often see that same scenario repeated in nonprofit decision-making. Continue reading

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FOUR BUCKETS: Accounting Standards and Donor Recognitions for Revocable Gift Commitments

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Donor recognition is just one of the issues of an ongoing discussion over the last several years with regard to revocable commitments for future gifts. The issues are: 1) how accountants should and should not count planned gifts on a balance sheet 2) how institutions should recognize planned gifts; and 3)
how they should count future gift acquisition. Most successful nonprofit fund development programs now track overall fundraising performance in three distinct buckets. I’ve added a fourth bucket. Continue reading

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OBSTACLES & DISINCENTIVES: Reasons for the Gap between Future Gift Potential and Future Gifts Secured

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Recently, the CEO of a hospital commented quite matter-of-factly, “At this point in my career, I’m not concerned about future gifts. I’ve got four more years before I retire. As he was congratulating himself for his own sense of clarity and purpose, I was thinking, “How deep of a hole will he dig for his successor in the next four years?” I have a lot of thoughts on why there’s such a gap between future gift potential and future gifts secured. A few of those observations are below: Continue reading

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AN ESTATE OF PHILANTHROPY: Creating a Multi-Generational Legacy of Giving

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Families that set up foundations to carry on their giving traditions are almost always disappointed — or would be if they lived to see the results. However, I have also been personally involved with a number of families over the years that represent the most extraordinary examples of multigenerational philanthropy one could imagine. Generally speaking, the difference between the successful and disappointing outcomes is in a particular type of asset transferred — specifically, a non-monetary legacy that has been systematically imprinted on succeeding generations. Continue reading

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